All About Cold Brew

What is Cold Brew Coffee?

Cold brew coffee refers to the process that the beans go through when brewing. Unlike the traditional hot cup of coffee, cold brew uses cool water to steep the grounds and it steeps for 12-24 hours and is then chilled before drinking. The result? A smoother, less acidic, slightly sweeter cup of cold coffee. In a traditional cup of hot coffee, it is the heat that extracts the flavors and aromatic chemicals. So when using cold water over a longer period of time to extract the flavor, you get a less-bitter tasting cup.

Some of the Benefits

Due to the longer steeping process, there is a higher caffeine content than a cup of drip-brewed hot coffee. Due to this higher caffeine content, it can aid in weight loss. Drinking a cup of cold brew after exercising can increase the “after-burn effect” of working out. Drinking a cup of regular hot coffee will also aid in the same way, but due to the higher caffeine content, cold brew will be more effective. Also, caffeine naturally increases the blood flow to the brain. The high amount of caffeine will allow more blood to flow, thus improving cognitive function more than the average cup of coffee. The smoother, less-acidic cold brew is also easier on stomachs, making it ideal for those with digestive or stomach problems.

Make sure to give our Signature Edalih Cold Brew blend a try to make your own cold brew at home!

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Fully Washed Process

Washed coffee, also referred to as the wet process, the coffee cherry is pulped by a machine. Once this outer layer has been removed, the bean with is mucilage is then fermented in water for at least one to two days and sometimes longer. After the fermentation process, the bean is then washed from its mucilage after it has released its aroma.Of all the coffee processing methods, this method often produces the highest quality coffee. However, it requires a lot of skill and water in order to perform correctly. Some of the world’s finest (and often most expensive) coffees are created using this process. In wet processing, freshly picked coffee fruits are pulped (mechanically separating the seed from the fruit), then the slippery mucilage that remains is removed through controlled fermentation, or in some cases, using a mechanical demucilator. This method produces clean, bright-toned, lighter-bodied coffees and carries a lower risk of defects. It is the process of choice in Colombia, Central America, Kenya and many other coffee producing countries.

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Pulped Natural, "Honey", Processing

Let’s talk through the basics first. The method was pioneered in Brazil around twenty years ago, where it was originally called Cereja Descascada or “peeled cherry”. This is because the process involves removing the skin of the fruit before letting the coffee dry with almost all of the pulp still on the beans. It’s essentially a middle ground between the dry and wet processing methods. During the natural (or dry) method, the beans are dried entirely in their natural form, while the washed (or wet) process sees all of the soft fruit residue, both skin and pulp, removed before the coffee is dried.

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Natural Processing

Coffee processing is a catch-all term that used to describe the various different processes by which the fruit—the sweet, fleshier outer part of the coffee cherry that most coffee drinkers sadly never get to taste—from the seed inside the fruit, which is shipped around the world and roasted (much to our collective delight here at Sprudge). One such style of processing is called “natural processing”, in which a coffee cherry is passively dried to separate seed from the pulp. Over the years, this natural processing method, which has been used for hundreds of years and has a spiritual home in Brazil, has been seen as a lesser method of coffee production to a roast-ready bean when compared to other processes.

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